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03/24/2012 / thriftomancer

Experimental Headgear

I’m making a hat!

Yes, I’ve (temporarily) moved away from scarves to create some nifty headgear out of one of the Salvation Army sweaters I’ve been tearing apart recently. Why? Well, mostly because it’s beginning to be more summery, which means more sun, which means I need a hat to protect my head and keep my brain from baking in the intense solar radiation. (A real problem with dark hair like mine.)

I started out following this pattern, which I originally found on this blog, thanks to Stumble Upon. The knobbly texture, with its promise of excellent ventilation (important in a summer hat), appealed to me and I had the yarn, so why not? Only problem was, I had no idea how to do the puff stitch. However, once again through the magic of Youtube, I figured it out and got to work.

Slouchy hat prototype MKI

Only problem was, within a few rounds, I realized the puff stitch wasn’t working out.

You can’t really see it in the picture since there aren’t enough rows of the stuff, but the more I did, the further it fanned out from the width I wanted. Honestly, I shouldn’t have been surprised that something called the puff stitch ended up being overly puffy. (Probably my fault for working the stitches too loosely or something, if I had to guess.) Still, it wasn’t my style so, instead of continuing and wasting my time, I pulled out all of the puff stitch section and re-crocheted it in a net stitch. Much more to my liking while just as well-ventilated and sun-blocking as the puff stitch would have been.

It’s not done yet, but this is what I’ve got thus far:

Slouchy hat prototype MKII

What was a little staggering, at least for me, was realizing just how much yarn the puff stitch takes. It makes perfect sense, of course, as each puff requires seven long loops of the stuff, but even so it’s still unsettling to find that just half of the yarn it took to make 4 rows of puff stitch has made 13 rows of netting.

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